The Everyday Activist Guide » 10 Things You Can Do To Combat Workplace Violence.

I really like this website Future Without Violence, they provide so much great information this article give tips on being a activist against sexual violence. We are living in an extraordinary time. Survivors of sexual violence are coming forward and some are finally being heard and believed.

And while a few powerful abusers are paying the price for their unlawful conduct, workplaces overall have been slow to respond to the structural, institutional, and cultural norms that underlie #metoo in the workplace.

But what if we could stop sexual assault and harassment in the workplace before it happens?

We can. Together.
— Read on checkyourworkplace.com/activist-guide/

Until It Happens To You.

We know that apart of domestic violence is sexual assault as well, it can start as early as middle school and continue on through adulthood. I saw this video by Lady Gaga and thought to myself this is such a great video that shines a light on sexual assault in college. Because statistics show,

Know The Stats…..

  • Between 20% and 25% of women will experience a completed and/or attempted rape during their college career (1)
  • More than half of raped college women tell no one of their victimization (1)
  • 80% of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of 30 (1)
  • 44% of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of 18 (1)
  • Persons with a disability had an age-adjusted rate of rape or sexual assault that was more than twice the rate for persons without a disability (1)
  • Juveniles (youth ages 17 and under) account for almost 90% of male victims in every type of sex crime (1)
  • 99% of people who rape are men (1)
  • In 1 in 3 sexual assaults, the perpetrator was intoxicated (1)
  • Only about 2% of all sexual assault accusations reported to police turn out to be false. This is the same rate of false reporting as other types of violent crimes. (1)
  • Victims were on a date with the perpetrator in 12.8% of completed rapes and 35% of attempted rapes (2)

Related:The Dating Abuse Statistics Everyone Should Know

  • 43% of the sexual victimization incidents involve alcohol consumption by victims and 69% involve alcohol consumption by the perpetrators (2)
  • Approximately 1 in 5 female high school students report being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner (3)
  • College freshmen and sophomore women appear to be at greater risk of being victims of sexual assault than are upperclassmen. 84% of the women who reported sexually coercive experiences experienced the incident during their first four semesters on campus. (4)
  • Students living in sorority houses and on-campus dormitories are 3 times and 1.4 times (respectively) more likely to be raped than students living off-campus (5)
  • 38% of college-aged women who have been sexually victimized while in college had first been victims prior to entering college, making past victimization the best predictor of future victimization (6)
  • At least 50% of college student sexual assaults are associated with alcohol use (7)
  • Fraternity men have been identified as being more likely to perpetrate sexual assault or sexual aggression than nonfraternity men (8)
  • College men who participated in aggressive sports (including football, basketball, wrestling and soccer) in high school used more sexual coercion (along with physical and psychological aggression) in their college dating relationships than men who had not. This group also scored higher on attitudinal measures thought to be associated with sexual coercion, such as sexism, acceptance of violence, hostility toward women and rape myth acceptance. (9)
  • 90% of acquaintance rapes involve alcohol (10)
  • 30% of the college women who said they had been raped contemplated suicide after the incident (11)

(1) U.S. Department of Justice
(2) National College Women Sexual Victimization
(3) Dating Violence Against Adolescent Girls and Associated Substance Abuse, Unhealthy Weight Control, Sexual Risk Behavior, Pregnancy and Suicidality
(4) An Examination of Sexual Violence Against College Women
(5) Correlates of Rape While Intoxicated in a National Sample of College Women
(6) Our Vulnerable Teenagers: Their Victimization, Its Consequences, and Direction for Prevention and Intervention
(7) High-Risk Drinking in College: What We Know and What We Need to Learn
(8) Coercive Sexual Strategies
(9) Dating Aggression, Sexual Coercion, and Aggression-Supporting Attitudes Among College Men as a Function of Participation in Aggressive High School Sports
(10) National Collegiate Date and Acquaintance Rape Statistics

What is affirmative consent, and how is USC combatting sexual violence?

Since the second-wave feminist movement of the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s to the debate over reproductive rights and the global phenomenon of #MeToo, a number of social and political factors have brought increased attention to issues of sexual violence and assault. Unfortunately, the problem endures: Today, it is estimated that 1 in 6 American women and about 3 percent of American men have been the victim of an attempted or completed rape.

“Though by no means a comprehensive answer to the problem of assault, creating clearer parameters to the definition of consent can help move the needle on the larger mission of eliminating sexual violence,” said Brenda Ingram, director of Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services at USC Student Health.

Ingram, who is also a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and the behavioral sciences at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, shed light on what affirmative consent is, what is being done about it at USC and why it should be made a legal standard in all states.
— Read on news.usc.edu/159880/what-is-affirmative-consent-usc-prevent-sexual-violence/

Why Are Activists Fighting to End Sexual and Domestic Violence are Calling for Gun Control

I was looking for an article to post that dealt with violence against youth and young adults dating, and I came upon this article that I thought was quite interesting. According to the member organizations of the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence—which represent thousands of programs and advocates serving victims and working to prevent domestic violence, dating violence, sexual violence and stalking across the country—mourn the tragic loss of life this past weekend in the latest horrific mass shootings that occurred in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH.

We call on all policy makers to condemn the bigotry and hateful rhetoric that is fueling increased violence. We also call on policy makers to enact common-sense laws to curb gun violence and help prevent countless murders and the severe harm inflicted on individuals, families and communities.

The work of ending domestic and sexual violence is, at its core, an effort to end the harm caused when one person exerts dominance over someone else through tactics of abuse and control, which often results in violence. With each incident of mass violence, it becomes more evident that gender-based violence, abuse, oppression and bigotry are inextricably tied. Efforts to prevent these heinous acts require a larger societal commitment to end abuse and oppression in all its forms, particularly at the intersections.

The quest to end domestic and sexual violence must align with the quest to end racism, misogyny, xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia, religious bigotry toward Jewish and Muslim communities and other forms of oppression toward marginalized communities—including immigrant and Native American communities.

read more…NATIONAL TASK FORCE TO END SEXUAL AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Could federal court ruling push how colleges handle sexual assault to U.S. Supreme Court?

DETROIT — A ruling this week by the federal 1st Circuit Court of Appeals could be the key to landing the issue of how universities handle sexual assaults before the U.S. Supreme Court. 
— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/1968204001

Yes, It Happened to Him.

We as a nation really don’t think of the male gender as victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking victims. We say things like he’s a boy are a man they can defend themselves if they are attacked. Well let’s take a look at some statistics, because just like many americans I didn’t really believe it myself.

At least 1 in 6 men have been sexually abused or assaulted.

Researchers have found that at least 1 in 6 men have experienced sexual abuse or assault, whether in childhood or as adults. And this is probably a low estimate, since it doesn’t include noncontact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects. If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.

  • Researchers use “sexual abuse” to describe experiences in which children are subjected to unwanted sexual contact involving force, threats, or a large age difference between the child and the other person (which involves a big power differential and exploitation). See former advisory board member Dr. Jim Hopper’s Sexual Abuse of Males for a detailed discussion of definitions and research methods, including how some result in lower estimates than 1 in 6 (e.g., large national surveys using telephone interviews with few questions).
  • Having such an experience does not mean a boy will definitely suffer significant long-term negative consequences. That depends on several factors, including how many times it happened, how long it went on, who else was involved, whether the boy told anyone and, if so, the response he received.

What the research tells us:*

  • A 2005 study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, on San Diego Kaiser Permanente HMO members, reported that 16% of males were sexually abused by the age of 18.1
  • A 2003 national study of U.S. adults reported that 14.2% of men were sexually abused before the age of 18.2
  • A 1998 study reviewing research on male childhood sexual abuse concluded that the problems is “common, under-reported, under-recognized, and under-treated.”3
  • A 1996 study of male university students in the Boston area reported that 18% of men were sexually abused before the age of 16.4
  • A 1990 national study of U.S. adults reported that 16% of men were sexually abused before the age of 18.5 Reference* 1in6.org

Because of lack of knowledge me and several million people have never took the time to believe that the male gender is just as susceptible to sexual violence as the female population. I truly apologize for my lack of knowledge.

If your a male victim of sexual assault remember your not alone.


We are a small advocacy group with a big heart, if we are unable to help you we will try our hardest to refer you to someone who can.